SOM Faculty Publications

Are you interested in seeing what your colleagues and co-workers are publishing?  Are you curious to see how prolific scientists and clinicians are in their research publications?  If so, then click on the following link to see a list of all of the work published by LSU investigators: 

http://www.refworks.com/refworks2/?site=028971136005200000%2fRWWS2A1148886%2f000271111069551000

If you’re just interested in seeing some highlighted works, you can go to the following link on a monthly basis to see a few select articles highlighted by the library staff: 

http://www.lsuhsc.edu/library/databases/facpubs.aspx

Once there, click on the year and month to see all highlighted publications for that month. 

If you do not see one of your publications listed in the comprehensive list, please contact Kathryn Kerdolff (kkerdo@lsuhsc.edu) to have your publication included.

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What’s Going On in Your Neck of the Woods? September

Cell Biology and Anatomy

The Department of Cell Biology & Anatomy was given the honor of being selected by the graduating L-4’s as the BEST preclinical department.   Dr. William Swartz was selected to be a hooder for the graduating class.   Dr. Ham Farris was selected as the BEST preclinical professor.   Dr. Jason Middleton received funding for his LBCRP project entitled “Plastic restoration of neural networks in tinnitus.”   Dr. Jason Mussell received funding from the Arnold Gold Foundation for his project entitled “An argument for the ethical use of fetal remains in medical education.”   Dr. Whim received funding from the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International for his grant entitled, “Use of NPY1 antagonists as a new approach to preventing hypoglycemic-associated autonomic failure.”  

Genetics

Andrew Hollenbach, Ph.D. was invited to give a series of lectures at Weill Cornell Medical School in New York City on the Writing of a Ruth L. Kirschstein NIH Training Grant.   Lucio Miele, MD, Ph.D. was appointed to the Editorial Board of Oncogene.   Lucio Miele, MD, Ph.D. presented the All of Us Precision Medicine Research Program at the National Association of City and County Health Organization (NACCHO) conference held in New Orleans.   Michael Lan, MD received an R21 grant from the National Cancer Institute, NIH.  

Microbiology, Immunology, and Parasitology

Dr. Jeff Hobden did an interview on WWL radio about pathogenic bacteria on shopping carts that was broadcast on June 4.   Dr. Jeff Hobden was selected as Didactic Educator of the Year by the Class of 2019 Physician Assistant students.  

Neurosurgery

On June 1, 2018 University Medical Center – New Orleans presented Neurosurgery resident Cliff Crutcher the “Resident Quality Champion” Award. This honor is in recognition of his extraordinary dedication and commitment to the development and implementation of House Officers’ Patient Safety and Quality Improvement Initiatives.  

Pediatrics

Pediatrics Assistant Professor and Pediatric Residency Program Director Chelsey Sandlin, MD was awarded the Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award by the Class of 2018. The award recognizes faculty members who demonstrate both clinical excellence and outstanding compassion in the delivery of care and who show respect for patients, their families, and healthcare colleagues.   Dr. Sandlin was also recently selected by the Association of Pediatric Program Directors (APPD) for participation in their prestigious APPD Leadership in Educational Academic Development (APPD LEAD) program. APPD LEAD is a nationally recognized program that provides a unique opportunity for pediatric academic leaders in medical education to engage and learn from seasoned program directors, pediatric educators, and other national leaders in pediatrics. APPD LEAD is an approximately nine-month educational program. The LEAD curriculum focuses on organizational leadership, competency-based curriculum development, faculty development, residency and fellowship program administration, scholarship and career development. The curriculum is paced over three educational conferences, with additional group activities, readings and project work expected between conferences. Chelsey is beginning her second year as LSU Department of Pediatrics Residency Program Director. She is already identified as an educational leader in our institution and the APPD LEAD program will bring great value to LSU, CHNOLA and our learners.   The American Society for Pediatric Hematology-Oncology (ASPHO) has elected Pinki Prasad, MD, MPH as the Chair-Elect for their Diversity Special Interest Group. The Diversity SIG advises the Board of Trustees of ASPHO on the needs and opportunities for promoting diversity, inclusion, and cultural competency within the society. Founded in 1981, ASPHO currently has 2,000 members. ASPHO offers a forum for the exchange of ideas on issues of special interests and concern to people in the specialty, as well as a means for facilitating communication among members. ASPHO is the only professional organization dedicated solely to the professional development and interest of subspecialists in pediatric hematology/oncology. Pinki is a tremendous asset to our Department, University and Children’s Hospital. Now the Pediatric Heme Onc community will benefit from her leadership skills and talents.   The Department of Pediatrics hosted its annual Research Day on Friday, June 1. Students, Residents, Fellows and Junior Faculty presented over 30 posters and 7 oral presentations. The day was dedicated to Dr. Ricardo Sorensen who will be retiring on June 30.

Words from the Library – September

Off-Campus Access to Library Resources now made by EZproxy 

Rebecca Bealer, MLIS
Assistant Librarian and Assistant Professor 

On November 15th, 2017, the LSUHSC Libraries transitioned to a new off-campus authentication system. We switched to EZproxy, which is used in most academic libraries in Louisiana and the U.S. 

You will be asked to provide your Library barcode and PIN when accessing resources off campus: 

Words From the Library

 If you currently have a Library account (barcode) and PIN, you can easily log into EZproxy. 

LSU Health Psychiatry Expertise Tapped For La Response To Opioid Crisis

Leslie Capo – Director of Information Services 

NOTE:  The following story also appeared in New Orleans’ City Business Magazine 

Working with the Louisiana Office of Behavioral Health, LSU Health New Orleans Department of Psychiatry will receive $7.2 million to address the opioid crisis in Louisiana. The funding, which will be directed toward the delivery of a combination of treatment, training and consultation activities, is part of  $23.5 million in grants over two years  from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration of the US Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to the Louisiana Department of Health. The Louisiana State Opioid Response Program will follow an evidence-based model that integrates a center of addiction expertise as a hub with spokes – a regional network of providers. 

As the only medical school in Louisiana certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in the subspecialty of Addiction Psychiatry, LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine is the most qualified entity in the state to deliver and/or coordinate integrated supports and services designed to increase patient access to Opioid Use Disorder treatment. LSU Health New Orleans Department of Psychiatry’s role will involve a range of training and consultation services. These services include broad-based patient and programmatic support, as well as consultation to treating physicians participating in the Louisiana State Opioid Response Program. A major responsibility for the Department of Psychiatry will be to assure Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) services are consistent with the program requirements and patient needs. This important and innovative work will be directed by Dr. Howard Osofsky, Chairman of the LSU Health New Orleans Department of Psychiatry. Under Dr. Osofsky’s leadership, LSU Health New Orleans Department of Psychiatry has a distinguished history of bringing innovations in care to address serious and complex behavioral health issues affecting the health of Louisiana residents. 

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health, in 2016, there were 346 opioid-related overdose deaths in Louisiana—a rate of 7.7 deaths per 100,000 persons—compared to the national rate of 13.3 deaths per 100,000. 

Since 2012, use of heroin and synthetic opioids has increased dramatically in the state. From 2012 to 2016, heroin and synthetic opioid-related overdose deaths increased from 51 to 149 deaths and from 19 to 89 deaths, respectively. 

“The successful implementation of this collaborative endeavor led by the Office of Behavioral Health, will increase much needed access to evidence-based treatment models throughout Louisiana,” notes Dr. Howard Osofsky, Chairman of Psychiatry at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine. 

In Memorium – Seth Bombet

Seth Bombet

It is with a heavy heart that the School of Medicine mourns the loss of one of its students.  Seth Bombet, a member of the Class of 2022, passed away on October 11, 2018 at the age of 24 following a several year battle with bone cancer.  Seth, a native of Baton Rouge and a resident of New Orleans, graduated from Louisiana State University, summa cum laude in biological science. He was a medical student at Louisiana State University School of Medicine in New Orleans. Growing up, Seth loved learning, and spending his summers at Henry S. Jacobs Camp, a summer camp for Jewish youth. He went on as a young adult to become a counselor at summer camp programs as well as Camp Dreamstreet, a free program hosted at Jacobs Camp for disabled children. He was an active participant in the Southern Federation of Temple Youth, and was a brother of Theta Xi fraternity at Louisiana State University. He is survived by his father, Charles N. Bombet II; his mother, Carolyn P. Bombet; sisters: Natalie B. Sack and her husband Kenneth and Elizabeth B. Hanson and her husband Justin; paternal grandparents, Julius “Buddy” Bombet and Lizca Bombet and Henry Spielberger; and maternal grandfather, Vincent W. Miranda, Sr. Seth is preceded in death by his brother, Joshua Albert Bombet; his mother, Andrea Clare Miranda; and grandmothers, Ruth Silverman Spielberger and Marion Peltier Miranda. 

Tiger Run 2018

Aubrey Schacter (Class of 2020) 

The 32nd Annual Tiger Run 5K and 1 Mile Fun Run took place on November 18th in Audubon Park. It was a beautiful day spent with colleagues, friends, and family. Over 150 runners came out to support, and a wonderful time was had by all. After a fast and fun race, runners enjoyed jambalaya and other delicious refreshments. They also participated in various post-race festivities hosted by our student-run organizations, including a health fair, face painting, and other fun activities. Congratulations are due to Kaylin Beiter and Patrick Bernard, the fastest Female and Male 5K runners, respectively. Congratulations are also due to largest and fastest team, the L-Runs, who entered the race with 19 participants.  

Hosted by the LSU School of Medicine Student Government Association, funds from the Tiger Run directly benefit various student-run charitable organizations. This year, funds were allocated to Student Run Homeless Clinics, CORE, Tiger Cubs and NOWS Outreach Program. In addition, the students elected to make a special donation in honor of their late classmate, Seth Bombet. Seth was a counselor at Camp Dreamstreet, a summer camp that benefits children with physical disabilities in the Southeast region, and the organization was very important to him.  

These student-run organizations receive funding from community donations and grants, and much of their support comes from those who generously contribute to the cause and recognize the value that these groups provide to the community. Donations directly fund the organizations and their charitable outreach, and students are grateful for any financial assistance. Donations are handled by the LSU Health New Orleans Foundation, which is a 501(c) 3 non-profit organization. If you missed this year’s Tiger Run and would like to help support these student-run organizations, please visit the LSU Health New Orleans Foundation web page today.  

Special thanks to Mr. John Melvin, The Talley Family, Costa del Mar, Insanitea Kombucha, Zapp’s, LSU Medical Alumni Association, Campus Federal, Sonic, Oral & Maxillofacial Surgical Associates, Dr. DaShawn Bakari, Dr. Anh Lee, Dr. Amanda Bray, and Dr. Raymond Watts for their contributions to the event.   

PurpleStride – The Walk to End Pancreatic Cancer!

Jennifer Gnerlich, M.D. (Department of Surgery) 

While pink may be the rage in October, we find ourselves turning to purple in November to support pancreatic cancer awareness. While not a common cancer, the number of people affected is increasing every year with an expected 55,000 to be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer this year. 

The hardest part about pancreatic cancer? There is no screening test, blood work, or X-ray to detect this cancer at an early stage. So, people are left to try and figure out the warning signs on their own, usually after the cancer is at advanced stages. In fact, over 50% of patients will present with Stage IV (terminal) disease. 

I was recently asked how we can make rare cancers more well known to aid in patient support and funding for research. Awareness is the key, but not always a simple solution. A celebrity being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer brings it to the spotlight for a brief time: Patrick Swayze, Alan Rickman, and Aretha Franklin, to name a few. To really have an impact, we need something more lasting, and that is where the Pancreatic Cancer Action Network (PanCAN) comes into play.  

Their main event is PurpleStride – the walk to end pancreatic cancer and wage hope. While it happens around the nation at different times of the year, their mission is the same: raising money for research, counseling services for patients, and advocating on a federal level, which happens every June in Washington DC. The NCI funding for other major cancers is anywhere from 3 to 6 fold more than for pancreatic cancer, but the 5-year survival rate is 8.5% for pancreatic cancer compared with 90% for breast cancer. These huge differences mean that funding support needs to make a major shift.  

My passion for my patients extends outside of the operating room, and that was why it was important for LSU to become the first Flagship Team in Louisiana and the first of four Flagship Teams in the nation. By becoming a Flagship Team, we announce to the Louisiana area and nation that we are dedicated to finding help for his disease and becoming a destination center. With almost 100 team members to run, walk and fundraise, we ended up raising over $6500 for PurpleStride and helping PanCAN reach their goal of achieving over $100,000 in funds. A superb achievement for LSU and PanCAN!  

There were so many great things about the PurpleStride event held on Sunday, November 4, 2018. LSU received an award for the #3 team in fundraising, which means that we are not only standing out for the excellent cancer care that we provide for our patients, but also by our community involvement and spirit.  My patient, Mr. Joseph Durr, and his wife came out to walk after 45 days in the hospital following a very difficult pancreatic surgery. It makes me proud that my patient is back up on his feet and ready to tell the world his story in order to bring about the necessary change.  

As you can imagine by the above numbers, survivors are the minority here and a lot of family members walk in remembrance of a loved one. My hope is that this will slowly change in the future. With fire in our belly and purple in our hearts, I truly believe that we can find new ways to treat this disease. While PurpleStride and the LSU team “Purple Reign” is over this year, plan to come out next year for the event! 

LSU Health Psychiatry Expertise Tapped For La Response To Opioid Crisis

Leslie Capo – Director of Information Services 

NOTE:  The following story also appeared in New Orleans’ City Business Magazine 

Working with the Louisiana Office of Behavioral Health, LSU Health New Orleans Department of Psychiatry will receive $7.2 million to address the opioid crisis in Louisiana. The funding, which will be directed toward the delivery of a combination of treatment, training and consultation activities, is part of  $23.5 million in grants over two years  from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration of the US Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to the Louisiana Department of Health. The Louisiana State Opioid Response Program will follow an evidence-based model that integrates a center of addiction expertise as a hub with spokes – a regional network of providers. 

As the only medical school in Louisiana certified by the American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology in the subspecialty of Addiction Psychiatry, LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine is the most qualified entity in the state to deliver and/or coordinate integrated supports and services designed to increase patient access to Opioid Use Disorder treatment. LSU Health New Orleans Department of Psychiatry’s role will involve a range of training and consultation services. These services include broad-based patient and programmatic support, as well as consultation to treating physicians participating in the Louisiana State Opioid Response Program. A major responsibility for the Department of Psychiatry will be to assure Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) services are consistent with the program requirements and patient needs. This important and innovative work will be directed by Dr. Howard Osofsky, Chairman of the LSU Health New Orleans Department of Psychiatry. Under Dr. Osofsky’s leadership, LSU Health New Orleans Department of Psychiatry has a distinguished history of bringing innovations in care to address serious and complex behavioral health issues affecting the health of Louisiana residents. 

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse of the National Institutes of Health, in 2016, there were 346 opioid-related overdose deaths in Louisiana—a rate of 7.7 deaths per 100,000 persons—compared to the national rate of 13.3 deaths per 100,000. 

Since 2012, use of heroin and synthetic opioids has increased dramatically in the state. From 2012 to 2016, heroin and synthetic opioid-related overdose deaths increased from 51 to 149 deaths and from 19 to 89 deaths, respectively. 

“The successful implementation of this collaborative endeavor led by the Office of Behavioral Health, will increase much needed access to evidence-based treatment models throughout Louisiana,” notes Dr. Howard Osofsky, Chairman of Psychiatry at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine.